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Monday, March 15, 2004

Petition against Gibson's movie as a hate crime

It's late at night, and I don't know what I think of this yet, but a petition has been organized requesting the US Attorney General "to apply hate crimes statutes, as appropriate," to Gibson's "Passion."
Mel Gibson’s “The Passion of the Christ,” through purposeful rewriting of the Christian Gospel mythos has, itself, become an anti-Semitic diatribe which, since it’s February 25, 2004 release resulted in hate crimes against Jews, Synagogues and Jewish Cemeteries in cities throughout the US. Mel Gibson’s unbiblical and a-historical account of the “crucifixion” story has taken Hutton Gibson’s claims that the Holocaust is “fiction,” even one step further.

Just as Adolf Hitler described the 300th anniversary performance of the Oberammergau Passion Play as "a convincing portrayal of the menace of Jewry" in 1934, Gibson and Writer/producer Tom Fontana’s 2004 use of extreme graphic and excessive violence set up and perpetrated at the urging of “the Jews” in their portrayal displays a clear prejudicial bent against the Jewish faith.

United State law defines "bias related" or “hate crime” to mean a "designated act that demonstrates an accused's prejudice based on the actual or perceived race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibility, physical handicap, matriculation, or political affiliation of a victim of the subject designated act." Depending on the state, criminal and / or civil laws may apply, as well as recently enacted Federal statutes.

We implore US Attorney General John Ashcroft and the US Department of Justice to evaluate the anti-Semitism clearly presented in Gibson and Fontana’s portrayal, and ask that civil, criminal, and Federal hate-crime laws, as appropriate, be utilized not only against the perpetrators involved in each and every act which it has encouraged, but against the directors, producers, and screen writers responsible for the work itself.
Why don't we just call the ACLU instead? Just kidding . . . (Do check out this link, though -- Daniel Pipes thinks it was perhaps the ACLU who instigated the disruption of his talk at American University.)